When observed from the ground, the frequency of the atomic clocks flying on the satellites of a Global Navigation Satellite System is referred to as apparent frequency, because it is observed through the on-board signal generation chain, the propagation path, the relativistic effects, the measurement system, and the clock estimation algorithm. As a consequence, the apparent clock frequency is affected by periodic variations of different origins such as, for example, the periodic component of the J2 relativistic effect, due to the oblateness of the earth, and the clock estimation errors induced by the orbital estimation errors. We present a detailed characterization of the periodic variations affecting the apparent frequency of the Galileo clocks, obtained by applying time-frequency analysis and other signal processing techniques on space clock data provided by the European Space Agency. In particular, we analyze one year of data from three Galileo Passive Hydrogen Masers, flying on two different orbital planes. Time-frequency analysis reveals how the spectral components of the apparent frequency change with time. For example, it confirms that the amplitude of the periodic signal due to the orbital estimation errors depends on the angle between the sun and the orbital plane. Moreover, it allows to find a more precise estimate of the amplitude of the J2 effect, in agreement with the prediction of the general theory of relativity, and it shows that such amplitude suddenly decreases when the corresponding relativistic correction is applied to the data, thus validating the analytical formula used for the correction.

Time-frequency analysis of the Galileo satellite clocks: looking for the J2 relativistic effect and other periodic variations / Formichella, V; Galleani, L; Signorile, G; Sesia, I. - In: GPS SOLUTIONS. - ISSN 1080-5370. - 25:2(2021). [10.1007/s10291-021-01094-2]

Time-frequency analysis of the Galileo satellite clocks: looking for the J2 relativistic effect and other periodic variations

Formichella, V;Signorile, G;Sesia, I
2021

Abstract

When observed from the ground, the frequency of the atomic clocks flying on the satellites of a Global Navigation Satellite System is referred to as apparent frequency, because it is observed through the on-board signal generation chain, the propagation path, the relativistic effects, the measurement system, and the clock estimation algorithm. As a consequence, the apparent clock frequency is affected by periodic variations of different origins such as, for example, the periodic component of the J2 relativistic effect, due to the oblateness of the earth, and the clock estimation errors induced by the orbital estimation errors. We present a detailed characterization of the periodic variations affecting the apparent frequency of the Galileo clocks, obtained by applying time-frequency analysis and other signal processing techniques on space clock data provided by the European Space Agency. In particular, we analyze one year of data from three Galileo Passive Hydrogen Masers, flying on two different orbital planes. Time-frequency analysis reveals how the spectral components of the apparent frequency change with time. For example, it confirms that the amplitude of the periodic signal due to the orbital estimation errors depends on the angle between the sun and the orbital plane. Moreover, it allows to find a more precise estimate of the amplitude of the J2 effect, in agreement with the prediction of the general theory of relativity, and it shows that such amplitude suddenly decreases when the corresponding relativistic correction is applied to the data, thus validating the analytical formula used for the correction.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
s10291-021-01094-2.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Versione editoriale
Licenza: Creative Commons
Dimensione 6.39 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
6.39 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11696/76166
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 12
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 11
social impact